Inside this week | American public not the bigger picture

I know I can come across as a bit obsessed with award shows (see here for details of The Grammys), but a startling truth hit me square between the eyes the other day: they are all on Sunday.

A quick search online revealed that this has been questioned before and attributed to strategic reasons – apparently there’s rarely anything decent on. But this is of course complete crap: all the major TV drama series tend to be broadcast on Sunday. So what gives, America?

I can only presume they don’t care about the rest of us. After all, if us Europeans had to stay up late on a Saturday, or the Australians, Chinese and Japanese had to stay home on a Sunday to watch them, surely more people would tune in to see the Oscars, Emmys, Grammys etc.

Now I know advertising restrictions block US commercials from being shown overseas, or something like that, but they’re not the only products on the table. Films, TV series, musicians and fashion designers all benefit from these occasions, to name just a few. And I’m sure there would be a few non-US employers grateful to see their absenteeism figures on certain Mondays crash by 1,000 percent.

It’s a bit like fashion (read more on the Fashion Festival here) and fat people – no, fat people in general, not the Americans watching award shows – as you don’t get the impression the industry cares about appealing to people who are too short, tall or  wide to don their dainty little clothes. Which is most people these days.

Fortunately the city’s charity shops won’t ignore your existence according to your size, and they’re cheap too. Specialised vintage shops have done their best to raise the prices of old clothes – didn’t we use to call them rags? – but there are still thousands of bargains out there that an old lady will arbitrarily charge you a pittance to purchase.

Getting legitimately undercharged for something is surely one of the best feelings in the world, although every year fashionistas queue up to fight tooth and nail to go through that experience in reverse.

 





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