Inside This Week | Checking IN: 1998; checking OUT: 2014

Thomas Fleurquin founded this entertainment guide in May 1998. Two years later, a party to celebrate its birthday ended up becoming the first ever Distortion. Like the best parties, InOut has never been meticulously planned – its conception and scope is haphazard to say the least. But it does deliver on providing a compact impression of what there is to do in Copenhagen – in ways that many other publications fail.

We know we’re reasonably popular, and we’ve always appreciated that most of our readers understand our limitations. But this modus operandi has become nonviable and, just like Fleurquin’s popular street party has demonstrated, change is needed to survive and keep going.

This publication in its current format will not return, so make no mistake: this is the final issue of InOut. But the Copenhagen Post will be back with a different entertainment listings supplement. And when we do, it will be a different approach and format.

In the meantime, the newspaper will do its best to keep you informed about the events, exhibitions and performances worth going to in town. Next week, page 21 will include seven such recommendations (let’s face it, sometimes finding seven is a struggle), while page 22 and 23 will continue to supply you with information about new films and TV series worth checking out.

And when we return – soon, we hope – it will be with a monthly publication, which should go some way to solving the problem of reading about something that sounds brilliant and took place last night.

In the meantime, I’d like to raise a glass to all the tireless contributors who have helped me since I became the editor back in May 2008. I’ve had some really talented people work for me – although unfortunately their talent was rarely in writing. 

But seriously, I am so grateful that so many have deigned to write for us over the years. We’ve tried to make the perks as good as possible, but there was nothing we could ever do about the derisory pay.

And last but not least, thank you for reading us (in most cases for free … ah, now I understand). We’re looking forward to bringing you a replacement guide as soon as we can.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.