Denmark enters into partnership with Japan

The agreement will benefit growth and employment in Denmark, Thorning-Schmidt said

Denmark has taken steps to further improve relations with Japan after the two nations agreed to a strategic partnership yesterday in Tokyo.

Prime minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt (S) and Japan’s prime minister Shinzo Abe agreed to the deal in connection with the Danish PM’s visit to the nation with the world’s third largest economy this week – a trip that will be cut short due to an extraordinary EU meeting on Thursday about the situation in Ukraine.

“Japan is an important country for Denmark, politically and financially," Thorning-Schmidt said in a press conference. “Japan’s economy is larger than Brazil, Russia, Indonesia and South Africa combined. The nation is a technological giant and an incredibly interesting market for Danish companies.”

The partnership will contribute to the promotion and positioning of Denmark as a political and financial partner for Japan and will help expand the co-operation between Danish and Japanese authorities, businesses and research institutions.

READ MORE: PM interrupts Asia trip due to situation in Ukraine

A commercial and political boost
Furthermore, the partnership with further strengthen Danish welfare technology and life sciences, as well as the arenas of agriculture and food products. The energy and environmental area, science, innovation and education will also benefit.

Finally, the partnership will cater to a social and cultural co-operation, focusing in particular on the promotion of international exchange and tourism.

“There is no doubt that this partnership will strengthen Denmark’s relationship with Japan, politically and commercially, in the coming year,” Thorning-Schmidt said. “It will be important for growth and employment in Denmark.”

Last year, Denmark exported goods and services to Japan with a value of 25.5 billion kroner.





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