A sizzling success for Weber in Denmark

Weber has made profits in Denmark for the past 13 years

The US grill giant Weber continues to impress in Denmark. For 2013, the company’s Nordic subsidiary, Weber-Stephen Nordic, has posted financial results showing a turnover of 670 million kroner and profits of 56 million kroner before tax.

According to the head of Weber-Stephen Nordic, Jens Bindslev, the Danish market accounts for nearly half of the profits generated by Weber-Stephen Nordic and is down to a long-term marketing strategy dedicated to changing the Danish perception of what their grills are capable of.

“We have focused a lot on getting closer to the consumers," Bindslev told Børsen newspaper. 

"We have turned focus away from the product and towards the experience."

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More than a sausage
One of the experiences that the company has striven to serve Danes is the increasingly popular pulled pork dish, which many Danes were unaware of until recently.

“If we don’t try to create these experiences, then the grill is nothing more than a dumb sausage and some pork chops,” Bindslev said, adding that gas grills were particularly popular in Denmark.

“We have experienced a strong development in gas grill sales. The grill has become part of everyday life – people want to grill every day.”

Weber-Stephen Nordic, which is based in Nørresundby near Aalborg, has made a profit in Denmark for 13 years in a row.





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