Financial crime figures: up and down

Overall increase but some good news

Børsen today reports that in the period from 2010 to 2013 there was an increase in the reported cases of insider trading and market manipulation in Denmark.

Figures from Finanstilsynet, the Danish financial services authority, show that the number of cases of of insider trading and market manipulation increased by ten and eight respectively compared to 2010.

Kim Hjortshøj Bederholm, an inspector at the FSA, told the newspaper that the biggest increase happened between 2012 and 2013. This could indicate the beginning of a trend of more financial crime in Denmark.

Silver lining
The article however draws attention to another development during the period: that cases of so-called immediate price manipulation dropped to zero in 2013.

”We see it as a success story that we have brought down the number of immediate price manipulation cases, where private persons sit at home at their computer and place an order and then buy in the opposite direction,” Bederholm told Børsen.

This kind of offence has in the past resulted in convictions for small investors. ”Everyone from pilots to nursery school teachers have been sentenced to prison time in these cases,” Bederholm told Børsen.





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