Also in cinemas | In our hour of need: speed in the lunchbox

What do you need? Like, really need. Even the most liberal parents will have told you that you need to brush your teeth two times a day. But is that really true? You can certainly go through life without.

Sure you might smell funny out of your m-hole, but then maybe you needn’t worry about that – if you’ve made the kind of life choices that make not brushing your teeth okay, then you are probably less than concerned about bodily odours.

Point is, you really need very little to get by: most of the stuff you need, you only want. So what do you want this week? Speed?

As you might have gathered by now, I’m not the need-for-speed type of gal. So is this why I’m not sure you want to be either this week? No, it’d be boring if we were all the same.
That being said, it’d also be boring to watch someone else play a video game for 130 minutes, I reckon, unless Angelina Jolie plays the main character. Which she doesn’t.

Need for Speed has been doing pretty badly in the North American box offices – so badly, that it did better in China! Still, video game fiends may feel compelled to give this new release a go.

And unless you’re Japanese, I am almost certain that you’ve never really felt the need for a lunchbox to weigh deep on your heart, but as it turns out, Mumbai is famous for its efficient lunchbox delivery system and in The Lunchbox, one tiny mistake turns frokost into fantasy romance.

Too bad love letters don’t come in hermetically-sealed salad boxes. And even if they did, that’s no guarantee that anyone would read them. What hits the nerve of our time is an app that sends pre-programmed messages on behalf of busy boyfriends (it’s real), not hand-written messages that may land in the wrong hands – even if the wrong hands are sometimes the right ones, like in this India/UK romcom.

If you haven’t found what you are looking for, like 500 Days of Summer (Cinemateket), I hope it’s because you didn’t really need it in the first place.





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