Transport analysis: No Kattegat bridge until 2050

Project would cost around 132 billion kroner

We’ve all been there. Needing to drive from Copenhagen to Aarhus or Aalborg and getting annoyed at having to drive south, then cross Funen before heading north again. Well, hold that feeling … for another 35 years.

A new analysis from the Transport Ministry has contended that a new Kattegat bridge, which would connect northwest Zealand with Aarhus in Jutland, won’t be necessary until 2050.

“Traffic model calculations indicate that the transport corridor Zealand-Funen-Jutland, including the Storebælt Bridge connection, will come under pressure around 2050,” the report stated.

“Current knowledge suggests that a Kattegat connection won’t be relevant, in terms of capacity, for a long time.”

READ MORE: Bornholm pleading for transport support

Improve the Lillebælt Bridge
Magnus Heunicke (S), the transport minister, has said earlier that a decision whether or not to build a Kattegat bridge should be taken in the near future so that it can be built in extension to the Femeren Bridge that will connect southern Denmark to Germany.

The report didn’t consider the societal or financial ramifications of a potential Kattegat bridge, nor where it would be, but instead recommended improving the Lillebælt Bridge and roads west of Odense, which are expected to be encountering critical congestion issues by 2030.

The analysis, here in Danish, estimated that a Kattegat bridge would cost somewhere in the region of 132 billion kroner.





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