Danish companies striking gold down under

A number of Danish green-tech companies are enjoying great success in Australia because of the nation’s acute need to satisfy its global climate responsibilities.

Pump manufacturing giant Grundfos, sustainable window and skylight producer Velux, and intelligent water and electricity measurement manufacturers Kamstrup are among the cleantech businesses making strides in the Australian market.

“Australia is forced to adhere to the global climate agenda,” Jesper Daugaard, the head of global marketing for Kamstrup, told Børsen business newspaper.

“They have taken their time getting started, but now the demand for our products has risen thanks to new legislation concerning saving water and energy.”

READ MORE: Poland is the new Danish export market

Huge potential down under
Australia has little or no tradition when it comes to the measurement or consumption of electricity and water by the individual citizen, but that must change now that the world is becoming more environmentally conscious, according to Søren Ø Sørensen, the head of Grundfos.

“We see a huge potential within energy efficiency. Parts of the country have too much water leading to flooding, while other areas are too dry,” Sørensen said.

“That requires water technology, a field that Danish companies are experts in. Australians have realised that energy efficiency is about more than money.”

Grundfos has had a subsidiary operating in Australia for the past three years and already enjoys a 600 million kroner annual turnover there.

Among the other companies making significant inroads in Australia are sustainable window and skylight producer Velux – which enjoyed record turnover and profits last year down under – and safety and rescue giant Falck, which expects turnover of up to 140 million kroner in Australia this year.
 





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