Sunstone might float biotech subsidiary in the US

Santaris develops medicine against various forms of cancer, metabolic illnesses and infectious diseases

Danish venture capital company Sunstone Capital is looking into the possibility of listing its partly-owned subsidiary, biotech company Santaris Pharma.

A final decision is expected to be made sometime this year, Sunstone said according to Reuters news agency.

“If we are going to launch an IPO, we would probably have to take the decision this year," Claus Andersson, a partner in Sunstone who is the deputy chairman of the Santaris board, told Reuters.

"And so we can execute it in the six to nine months it usually takes to launch an IPO."

READ MORE: OW Bunker storms out of the stock market gate

All about timing
Andersson wouldn't reveal the details of a potential listing, but he contended that the timing of it would be essential because investors would eventually run out of funds dedicated to life science investment.

Santaris – created via a merger back in 2003 – develops medicine against various forms of cancer, metabolic illnesses and infectious diseases.

Sunstone Capital owns close to a fourth of Santaris, which also lists the pension fund Lønmodtagernes Dyrtidsfond and Novo A/S as part owners.





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