Workplaces using private eyes to tail employees

It sounds like something from a film noir movie, but your boss may know if you’re going job-hunting instead of bed-ridden or just faking a sick day, Avisen reports.

A growing number of companies are hiring private investigators to track employees who call in sick, according to the national association of detectives and commercial investigators, FDDE.

"We are experiencing a slow but steady rise in companies ordering surveillance of their employees," FDDE deputy head Villy Anderson told the paper.

Hundreds under surveillance
The association estimates that several hundred employees every year are subjects of a private investigation ordered by their boss. Hiring PI's to monitor employees isn't illegal in public spaces, but the method raises concern from the unions.

"It's appalling when employers on ordinary contracts are using these methods," Bent Hansen, the legal head of Business Danmark told Avisen. "It doesn't belong in Denmark."





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