Government making millions off eastern Europeans

While Danes cost the state money, the average eastern European actually generates income

Danish workers take more money from state coffers than they give back, while eastern Europeans contribute to the economy, according to a new report.

The latest estimates from Dansk Arbejdsgiverforening (DA), the confederation of Danish employers, put the amount annually contributed to the state treasury by Europeans from countries like Poland, Lithuania and Romania at 900 million kroner .

Danes cost the state
While the average Dane costs the state 6000 kroner per year, the average eastern European worker contributes a net plus of 16,000 per year. Eastern Europeans are often educated in their home country, and constitute less of a burden on medical services and state pensions.

Personal income taxes, sales taxes, unemployment benefits, hospital visits and other costs are factored into the calculations.

Charity begins at home
DA head Jørn Neergaard Larsen told Berlingske newspaper that he hopes the report will help people realise that it is a good idea to have people from neighbouring countries working in Denmark.

READ MORE: More eastern Europeans getting unemployment compensation

Jobs for Danes
Venstre spokesperson Inger Støjberg wants the focus to be on puting Danes back in work.

“The welfare state is under pressure," she told Berlingske, "and, as long as we have 41,000 Danes who would readily take many of the jobs that Eastern Europeans now have in Denmark, it is important that we get Danes working before eastern Europeans,” she said.





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