Strong case against Denmark in killing of al-Qaeda leader

A human rights group wants PET to explain its involvement in an illegal CIA drone attack that killed a terrorist leader in Yemen

The international human rights organisation Open Society Justice Initiative (OSJI) wants Denmark to present any evidence that it might have that casts light on the role the intelligence agency PET played when CIA drones in 2011 killed the al-Qaeda leader Anwar al-Awlaki in Yemen.

OSJI demanded access to the government's documents in the case on Wednesday. Its involvement was confirmed by Jyllands-Posten in 2012 when it revealed that a former Islamist and PET agent, Morten Storm, helped track down the terrorist leader.

READ MORE: Human rights organisations demand investigation into PET

Overwhelming evidence against Denmark
Amrit Singht, the senior legal officer at OSJI, said that she believes the organisation has a strong case.

“There is overwhelming evidence in the public records that Denmark participated in the US operation to track and kill Anwar al-Awlaki,” Singh told Jyllands-Posten.

“But the Danish authorities have never meaningfully acknowledged this fact, and they have refused to inform the public and Danish parliament about their role. By participating in the operation, it appears that the Danish authorities may have violated both Danish law and international law as part of its support for the US government's so-called 'war on terror'," she said.

READ MORE: PET in yet another storm

While US president Barack Obama acknowledged that they were behind the illegal assassination of al-Awlaki, the Danish authorities have remained silent in the case.

Ex-agent pleased with legal action
Former agent Morten Storm said he hopes OSJI is ready to take the case all the way to the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg in France.

"I'm glad the organisation is taking up the case, so the truth may come out and those responsible at PET can be called to account for what they have done," Storm told Jyllands-Posten. "And I want to help if I can."





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.