Every ninth Dane has immigrant background

Some 22.3 percent of 29-year-old Danes are immigrants or their descendants

The percentage of immigrants and their descendants in Denmark continues to rise, according to the latest population figures from Danmarks Statistik.

At the beginning of 2014, 11.1 percent – one in nine – of the Danish population were immigrants or descendants of immigrants – a figure that is expected to rise to 17.6 percent by 2050.

“It is particularly the descendants’ share that is rising quickly,” Danmarks Statistik wrote.

“Their share will more than double by 2050 from 2.7 percent now to 6.1 percent. Concerning the number of persons, it will be the descendants of non-western immigrants who will increase the most.”

READ MORE: Immigration outpaces new births

Narrowing gap
In some age groups, immigrants and their descendants make up more than the average. Among 21 to 37-year-olds, they make up 15 percent, while they make up 22.3 percent among  29-year-olds.

And the gap between ethnic and non-ethnic Danes will continue to narrow. In 25 years the number of ethnic Danes aged 16-64 will shrink by 346,000 people, while the number of immigrants and their descendants is expected to increase by 243,000.

“Today, 13 percent of the 16 to 64-year-olds are immigrants or descendants. That number will rise to 21 percent in 25 years,” Danmarks Statistik wrote.

In total, the Danish population consists of 5,627,000 people today, but that will increase by 10 percent by 2050, according to the statistics keepers.





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