Drug smugglers taking the night train to Copenhagen

Smugglers are using cross-border trains to bring illegal drugs into the country

When the cross-border City Night Line train pulls into Copenhagen’s main station every morning, there is a chance that it is carrying illegal drugs and possibly other contraband. According to Jyllands-Posten newspaper, when the trains are targeted for inspection about once a month, drugs are often uncovered.

The Copenhagen Police commissioner, Steffen Steffensen, blamed the introduction of full-body scanners at Copenhagen Airport for persuading drug traffickers to switch from planes to trains.

READ MORE: Dramatic capture of drug smugglers re-opens borders debate

Martin Henriksen, a spokesperson for Dansk Folkeparti, said that cross-border trains combined with the Schengen open border agreement create an “invitation” to criminals.

“The only good answer to countering this is more controls,” Henriksen told Jyllands-Posten.

Planes, trains and automobiles
Karen Hækkerup, the justice minister, said that extra inspections on the trains would just encourage smugglers to switch routes.

“It is important to have a comprehensive approach so that criminals know they risk being caught, no matter what means of transport they use,” Hækkerup told Jyllands-Posten.

“If we intensify efforts on the trains, they will simply switch to cars.”





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