Denmark one of the best nations in the world for mothers

Africa supplied the nations in the bottom ten of the list with Somalia finishing last

For the 14th straight time, Denmark has ranked in the top ten in the world when it comes to being the best place to be a mother.

The annual 'State of the World's Mothers' report (here in English) published by the human rights organisation Red Barnet, listed Denmark sixth out of 178 countries based on financial, political and educational status, as well as child health and mother mortality.

“We are definitely at the top end, there is no doubt about that,” Mimi Jakobsen, the secretary-general of Red Barnet, told Politiken newspaper. “If there is anything to complain about, then it is the little rise in the mother mortality rate.”

READ MORE: Danish children breast-fed too little

African struggles
Jakobsen said that Danish women usually give birth when they are older and that artificial insemination and C-sections increase the risk of them dying.

Finland ranked first on the list, followed by Norway, Sweden, Iceland and the Netherlands. Spain, Germany, Australia and Belgium followed Denmark to round up the top 10.

Africa supplied the nations in the bottom ten of the list with Somalia finishing last followed by DR Congo, Niger, Mali, Guinea-Bissau, the Central African Republic, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Chad and the Ivory Coast.




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