Bornholm given right to apply for island subsidies

The EU Commission is expected to approve the Danish rural district program sometime in the next six months

The minister of food and agriculture, Dan Jørgensen, has decided to expand the list of islands for which farmers can apply for extra subsidies to help them overcome the challenges associated with plying their trade.

As part of the government’s rural district program for 2014-2020 – which has been sent to the EU Commission for approval – a total of 26 new islands, including Bornholm, are on the island subsidy list that Jørgensen wants to expand from 2015.

”The islands are particularly challenged and as a farmer it is extra difficult to financially make ends meet,” Jørgensen said in a press release. “That’s why we have decided to expand the list so that more challenged farmers can benefit from the island subsidies initiative.”

READ MORE: Bornholm pleading for transport support

Imminent approval
For farmers living on islands without a bridge connection, transporting animals, crops, feed and fertiliser can be an expensive endeavour compared to mainland farmers.

Jørgensen went on to add that the government is focusing on positive developments for the islands, which will hopefully lead to increased environment, growth and tourism potential on the islands.

The island subsidies consisted of 11.4 million kroner in 2014 – a figure that is expected to rise to 23 million kroner from next year.

The EU Commission is expected to approve the Danish rural district program sometime in the next six months.





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