Danish coach agrees to Bundesliga switch

Hjulmand coached FCN since 2011 and led them to the Superliga title in 2012 and subsequently the Champions League

After a week or so of speculation, Kasper Hjulmand has been officially confirmed as the next coach of the Bundesliga outfit Mainz 05.

The 42-year-old current coach of FC Nordsjælland can look forward to leading this year’s seventh place finishers in the top German league into Europe next season.

“Kasper Hjulmand precisely fits the profile that we were going after in a new coach,” Christian Heidel, the manager of Mainz 05, said on the clubs website.

“He is very competent and promotes an attacking style of football. In his homeland his enjoys an excellent reputation as a developer and coach of young players.”

READ MORE: Monday Sports Notes: Aalborg claims its fourth Superliga title

Success at FCN
Hjulmand was pleased to have been handed the reins at the German club, where he has been handed a three-year contract after coaching FCN since 2011 and leading them to the Superliga title in 2012 and subsequently the Champions League.

“I’ve followed the Bundesliga and already had an impression of the club,” Hjulmand said. “After speaking with manager Christian Heidel I was convinced and surprised at how perfect the club philosophy fit me. This change to Mainz is a decision made from the heart.”

Hjulmand will be able to lean on some Danish support when he makes the move south. Niki Zimling is on the club’s books and long-time Mainz stalwart Bo Svensson is expected to become a coach next season after playing over 100 games for the club.

Hjulmand will become just the fourth Dane to ever coach a team in the Bundesliga, following in the footsteps of Søren Lerby (1991-92 in Bayern Munich), Morten Olsen (1993-95 in FC Cologne) and Frank Arnesen (one game in 2011 in Hamburg SV).





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