Denmark wins prestigious energy efficiency prize

Denmark’s energy consumption not increasing since 1980 despite its economy growing by nearly 80 percent

Denmark’s ambassador to the US, Peter Taksøe-Jensen, was at hand in Washington DC on behalf of Denmark to receive ‘The EE Visionary Award’ for the nation’s efforts to reduce energy consumption nationally and abroad.

The award committee – consisting of 35 energy experts from around the world – focused on Denmark’s progressive stance on energy efficiency work, leading to Danish energy consumption not increasing since 1980 despite its economy growing by nearly 80 percent.

“I am excited to receive this award, which I believe confirms Denmark's position among the world's leaders at getting the most out of each kilowatt-hour,” the climate and energy minister, Rasmus Helveg Petersen, said in a press release.

“Over the years, Danish energy policy has required courage and investment, but it has in turn reaped major benefits, both environmentally and economically.”

READ MORE: Danish architects awarded prestigious prize

Energy consumption terminated
Today, Denmark is one of the most energy efficient countries on the planet, but it still has much potential within energy savings, and its energy agreement from 2012 aims to decrease consumption by 12 percent by 2020.

“We have found a model in which the energy companies help their customers save energy,” said Petersen.

“This has proven so successful that other EU countries are using the same method, which is yet another example of how Denmark is leading the way in the energy sector.”

The prize is handed out in connection with the annual energy conference Energy Efficiency Global Forum. Aside from Denmark, this year’s award also went to Arnold Schwarzenegger and Lee Jong-Cheol for their efforts in reducing energy consumption at a regional and local level.





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