Proposed US legislation could boost Rockwool stateside

Ambitious climate targets could help Danish insulation company

The Danish company Rockwool, which produces stone wool insulation for buildings, is about to open a new factory in Mississippi. Børsen business newspaper reports that the opening could coincide with stringent climate targets coming into force – to the benefit of the company.

The US government’s most recent climate proposal sets the goal of power stations reducing their 2005 emissions of CO2 by 30 percent come 2030.

Trent Ogilvie, the head of the North American subsidiary, told Børsen that the climate proposals were positive for Rockwool, but not the only reason for optimism.

“We have not based our business plan on whether new laws and rules come or not," Ogilvie said.

"We see a growing acceptance of the benefits of insulating. We see that the housing market and industry are improving, and that the economy is generally accelerating in the USA.”

Not holding their breath for CO2 rules
“In the USA, it is more the rule than the exception that this type of rule takes a long time to go through, but we believe they will come into force," Ogilvie said.

"We will definitely do what we can to push, including through our trade organisation. But I’m not changing my market or profit expectations right now. That would be too early. The new CO2 proposal is a positive factor, but it’s not a game-changer.”

The new factory has cost 900 million kroner and is Rockwool’s first in the USA. Factories in Canada also deliver to the US.

 





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