The Norway model could see Denmark make millions on fish waste

1.4 million could be made on fish waste

Over a billion kroner could be made from the country's annual 140 million tonnes of fish waste if Denmark followed Norway’s example, says project leader of the Trash2cash project Poul Ole Nielsen to DR Nyheder.

Fish parts – such as intestines, heads and stomachs – are fed to seagulls, used as fodder or simply thrown into the sea in Denmark. Instead, the ‘fish by-products’ could be used as in Norway, generating 1.4 billion kroner each year, according to figures from the Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Fisheries of Denmark.

READ MORE: Danes see great potential in ocean farming

Denmark missed out on an order of two 40-foot containers of cod stomachs from a Chinese buyer and fish oils are imported from Chile because Danish fish-oils are used to supplement feed for livestock.

“There is an Asian market for cod stomachs and swim bladders. In Norway, fish waste is sorted because it can be sold as commodities. Norway has among the highest salaries, so if they prioritise manual sorting of fish-waste, we can definitely count on there being bounties to collect” Poul Ole Nielsen said to DR.

Potential blue-energy
The Danish government has implemented a panel that aims to look at how Denmark can better utilise the resources of the sea, without compromising biodiversity and sustainability. 





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