Study shows good returns on R&D investments

Denmark leads the Nordics at profiting from research

A study published by the Education and Research Ministry has found that Danish companies get more out of investing in research than their competitors in Sweden, Norway and Finland.

Companies in Denmark get a return of 34 percent on investments in research, compared to 23 percent in Finland and Norway, and just 16 percent in Sweden.  

”It’s pleasing that we are so well positioned. Especially in the service industry, we can really get a lot out of investments in research and development. It’s a sign that this we can really get a lot for our money here.”

Philipp Schröder, a professor of economics at Aarhus University, believes the study validates that money spent by companies on research is a good investment.

“The analysis also shows that, for foreign investors, it can pay off to invest in research and development in Denmark,” he told Jyllands-Posten.

“Out of the four Nordic countries, it is the Danish companies that are good at turning research and development into value,” he continued.

Prioritisation
Meanwhile, the study has caused Danish industry advocates Dansk Industri to question the prioritisation of research resources.

Charlotte Rønhof, the organisation’s head of research, explained the concern to Jyllands-Posten.

“In Denmark we are good at investing in health science, and that makes good sense, because we have strong pharmaceutical companies," she said.

"But other companies have interests in technical sciences like the energy, the environment, transport, IT and food sectors. The government doesn’t make enough of this."





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