Danish donations among Greenpeace speculation losses

Greenpeace’s Nordic wing is supported by about 150,000 donors who contribute about 120 million kroner a year

A Greenpeace employee in Amsterdam has been sacked after losing 28.3 million kroner – some of which stems from Danish donors – on foreign currency speculation.

Greenpeace’s Nordic wing, which sends a third of all its donations to Greenpeace International, confirmed the news, stating that a smaller part of Danish donations were lost in the scandal.

“It’s very unfortunate that a human error and an internal procedure failure has led to the loss of money that private citizens from all over the world donated to Greenpeace,”  Lone Buchardt, the head of fundraising at Greenpeace Denmark, said in a press release.

READ MORE: Greenpeace activists may spend Christmas at home after all

Auditor investigating
The environmental advocate organisation has denied that the employee in question was attempting to enrich himself, but said that it could understand if its donors were disappointed in them.

“The person who made this bad decision has been fired, and an external auditor is making a considerable and impartial investigation into what went wrong and what we can do so that it doesn’t happen again,” Buchardt said.

Greenpeace’s Nordic wing is supported by about 150,000 donors who contribute about 120 million kroner a year. Some 37 million kroner has been sent to the organisation’s international department, and the expected Danish losses from the speculation are 185,000 kroner – half a percent of the total.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.