Politicians and royals steering clear of grand mosque’s opening

Opponents fear that Qatar will attempt to push a more conservative form of Islam

When Denmark’s largest mosque opens its doors for the first time on Thursday in Copenhagen’s Nordvest district, few prominent invitees will be present to take part in the celebrations. 

The Royal House, the nation’s ministers and most of the seven deputy mayors of Copenhagen have all been invited, but only the city’s deputy mayor for social issues, Jesper Christensen, has agreed to show up, according to a survey by DR’s radio station P4.

“Some conservative and radicalised sectors can use this as yet another argument against the democratic system and that politicians basically don’t want Muslims,” Yildiz Akdogan, a Socialdemokraterne City Council member, told DR Nyheder.

READ MORE: PM to skip mosque opening

Dreaded Qatar link
Mohamed Al Maimouni, a spokesperson for the Danish Islamic Council – which is behind the construction of the mosque – lamented the news and argued that it could worsen integration in Denmark.

“We are talking about Denmark’s first grand mosque – something that Muslims have been waiting over 40 years for,” Al Maimouni said. “This really means a lot to us.”

Many prominent people have declined to attend due to scheduling difficulties, while others have criticised the mosque, which has been financed with 150 million kroner from Qatar.

Opponents fear that Qatar will attempt to influence Danish Muslims and use a more conservative form of Islam to radicalise them.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.