Construction finally begins on rock ‘n’ roll museum

The project was first revealed way back in 2003

It took eleven years, but on June 30, construction work on the long-awaited Danish rock ‘n’ roll museum will finally commence following the confirmation that the entire 120 million kroner  funding package is in place.

Denmark’s Rock Museum, as it will be called, will be located in the new Musicon district of Roskilde, which is currently being developed and is expected to open in the spring of 2015.

The museum, which will also have regular temporary exhibitions, will focus on the history of rock music in Denmark over the past 60 years, using state-of-the-art exhibition technology, light studios, production rooms, a stage, a library, archives and an education and research centre.

READ MORE: Museum selling Viking ships to the public

Echoes of Gasolin
Even its address will have rock ‘n’ roll significance as it will be located on Rabalderstræde, the street aptly named after a song by arguably Denmark’s best ever rock band, Gasolin.

Aside from the museum, Musicon will also house the Roskilde Festival High School and the festival’s new headquarters.

The museum, which was originally announced way back in 2003, has been designed by the Dutch firm MVRDV in co-operation with the Danish architect firm COBE.





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