Police warn of organised Romanian burglars

The arrested thieves come from the same town and appear to know each other

Police report that several of the burglars they have arrested at different locations around Denmark come from the same town in Romania and know each other, according to police inspector Karl Erik Agerbo.

"From our perspective, it all looks really well organised," he told Jyllands-Posten.

Police curb smuggling
Two men will stand trial today in Lyngby after being charged with more than 40 break-ins over the course of eleven days. They had planned to carry the stolen goods on a bus to Romania.

When the police tapped the Romanians and found out they were about to leave the country, they raided the bus and confiscated 14 suitcases packed with stolen laptops, iPads, iPods, cameras, perfume, silverware and jewellery.

Organised scheme
Today's trial is part of a larger case involving 18 Romanians arrested on burglary charges. Several of the arrested Romanians come from the town of Tulsea, close to the Moldavian border.

"They come here and know how to commit break-ins. We believe someone was here who knew Denmark well, and that they have helped each other over time. It's probably difficult to stop it completely," Agerbo said, adding that police are working closely with their Romanian colleagues.





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