Roskilde Festival sold a record 102,000 tickets

With the help of the Rolling Stones, the festival beat its personal best

The Roskilde Festival sold 102,000 tickets this year – a new personal best that means the festival will once again be posting a healthy profit.

The full-week tickets sold out on 15 June. In addition, the festival sold 22,000 one-day tickets.

CEO Henrik Rasmussen doesn't know the exact results just yet. 

"We will know the final financial result in a few months, but after setting a record of more than 100,000 sold tickets and great sales at the shops, we expect the profit to be around 15-20 million kroner," he said in a press release.

Success in the face of adversity
Organising this year's festival has not been without its detractors. Some were critical that a substantial portion of the budget was spent on the Rolling Stones. Additionally, Drake was supposed to close the festival on Sunday, but cancelled two days before his show due to illness – the second time he has pulled out in four years.

However, the Rolling Stones proved to be the great draw of the festival. Organisers claim the band is one of the main reasons why the festival broke its attendance record this year.

The morning after
By the time Jack White rounded off the week instead of Drake last night, the guests had been offered a total of 166 concerts by artists from 30 countries. Any profits are always passed on to charities and cultural foundations. 

Besides all the guests, 31,000 volunteers helped making the event a success. Many of them are still there, dealing with the immense task of clearing up after the party.





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