Danish football strike averted in injury time

Months of conflict finally at an end

A Danish footballers' strike has been averted at the last minute after the clubs and players agreed to a new collective agreement late last night.

The agreement was essential to the Danish teams playing in Europe and means that FC Copenhagen, Aab Aalborg and FC Midtjylland won’t have to field their under-19 squads ahead of their Champions League and Europa League fixtures next week.

“We have agreed to a very important collective agreement,” Claus Thomsen, a former player who is the head of league association Divisionsforeningen, said in a press release.

“So the short-term and long-term future of Danish football has been secured. The European matches in the coming weeks can go ahead as planned. And the games here in the domestic leagues can also continue.”

READ MORE: Lockout threatening Superliga start

Months of squabbling
Danish football had been on the brink of a strike after Divisionsforeningen annulled the existing collective agreement in March. Negotiations over the spring provided no results and last night was the last-chance saloon in terms of avoiding a strike.

“It’s been intense but positive with a good atmosphere throughout the proceedings,” Martin Retov, the head of the players' association, told TV2 Sporten.

“It’s great we’ve all agreed, particularly for those playing in Europe. It’s massive for Danish football that they will be allowed to play.”

The agreement mostly hinged on better working hours, altered pension terms, the minimum wage and commercial rights.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.