Norwegian state’s Argentum fund planning big investments in Denmark

A successful year has given Norway a taste for the Danish market

The Norwegian state-owned investment fund Argentum is planning to radically increase its investment in Denmark, Børsen reports.

Argentum, which has 16 billion Norwegian kroner of assets under management, expects an increase in the share of its Danish investments from about 5 percent to 7 percent over the next five to ten years.

Good prospects in Denmark
Joachim Høegh-Krohn, the managing director of Argentum, is positive about prospects in Denmark.

“Denmark is an unbelievably good investment country for capital funds. Also in relation to other countries,” he told Børsen.

“The number of capital funds that are active is lower than other places, so there is potential.”

Direct investment likely
Until now, the Norwegian fund has only invested in capital funds, but it is now planning direct investments.

”We’re on the hunt for direct investments in Danish companies as joint ventures with capital funds,” Høegh-Krohn said.

A successful year
The announcement comes following a successful year for the fund’s current Danish investments. Argentum has benefited from its participation in the Axcel fund thanks to the listing of Pandora. This gave it a yield of 50 percent, while the sale of Georg Jensen yielded 40 percent.

“We’re going to double our investments in Denmark in the coming years,” Høegh-Krohn explained to Børsen.

“We expect to come up in the region of 1.5 billion kroner. There is great potential in Denmark that we want our share of.”





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