Danish Crown braced for more layoffs

Slaughterhouse giants feeling pig-decrease pinch

The slaughterhouse giant Danish Crown has warned that yet another round of layoffs could be imminent as the number of Danish pigs for slaughter continues to fall.

A new prognosis from agriculture and food product organisation Landbrug & Fødevarer shows 18.6 million pigs are expected to be slaughtered in Denmark this year, a 2-3 percent decrease on last year and 10 percent less than in 2011.

“We at Danish Crown have a responsibility to adapt our costs and change our capacity and slaughter structure when the number of pigs for slaughter decreases,” Asger Krogsgaard, the deputy chairman of Danish Crown’s board, told Børsen business newspaper.

READ MORE: Danish Crown outsources production to England

Pigs heading south
Danish Crown has closed 18 slaughterhouses and fired over 7,000 employees in Denmark over the past decade, and Krogsgaard said that the company may have to shut down further assets if more pigs don’t begin arriving at their slaughterhouses.

Most recently, Danish Crown decided to move its Faaborg plant to one of its Tulip production areas in Cornwall, England.

The reduction of pigs in Denmark is due to a significant export of piglets to Germany and Poland in particular, where it is more profitable to produce pigs for slaughter. Hence, German farmers can pay more for the piglets than the Danish farmers can.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.