Danish-Chinese energy co-operation beginning to pay off

China National Renewable Energy Centre a huge boost

Danish expertise on sustainable energy and green technology is making inroads in China – the world’s leading CO2 emitter – to the benefit of the global environment and Danish business.

The climate and energy minister, Rasmus Helveg Petersen, is currently in China along with Denmark’s prime minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt and a Danish delegation to further strengthen the close energy co-operation that has existed between the two nations since 2009.

“We have gained a footing in China,” Petersen said in a press release. “There is trust between us and they admit that we can show them something in terms of green energy.”

I spoke with the Chinese energy minister [Wu Xinxiong] concerning the value of investments, not just looking at the price of a wind turbine, but at its lifespan as well. The Chinese want the best technology and that is something that can lead to business for Danish companies.”

Along with Wu, Petersen visited Vestas’ factory in Tianjin yesterday where they discussed how Danish experience and knowledge of wind turbines, district heating, bio-fuels and energy efficiency can be utilised in China.

READ MORE: Denmark inks new energy co-operation deal with China

International contribution
Danish-Chinese co-operation has never looked back since the establishment of the China National Renewable Energy Centre (CNREC) in 2009 with the help of Danish expertise and funding.

The centre has been highly praised by leading politicians in China, and yesterday a British fund, the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF), revealed that it intends to support CNREC’s activities over the next five years with an 86 million kroner contribution.

“We have got a Danish-run energy centre up and running in the midst of a Chinese central administration,” Petersen said.

“That is unique and I am proud that it can make such a massive difference regarding Chinese energy policy. That the centre even receives international support only underlines that the idea and execution is correct. ”





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