Denmark sending transport ships to Ebola-stricken nations

An additional 40 million kroner of aid is on its way

The government has decided to increase its aid contribution to Ebola-stricken nations in western Africa by a further 40 million kroner. Additionally, a Danish transport ship has been offered to the UN to deliver aid to the population struggling with the ongoing epidemic.

The trade and development minister, Mogens Jensen, is taking part in a high-level meeting at the UN General Assembly in New York today to discuss the needs and the way the international community – governments, NGOs, the private sector and research institutions – handle the crisis.

“We need to act now if we want to tackle this terrible epidemic in west Africa,” Jensen said in a press release.

“It’s no longer just a health crisis, but also an economic and security disaster with serious consequences that can already be felt by millions of people in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.”

READ MORE: Danish sailors fear picking up Ebola from African ports

Lodgings for health workers
The Danes have earmarked 10 million kroner for the transport ships and a further 10 million kroner for the establishment of accommodation facilities for the international health personnel who are taking on the lethal virus that is stalking the region.

The final 20 million kroner will go to the World Health Organisation’s efforts concerning Ebola.

The figure takes Denmark’s total Ebola contributions up to about 65 million kroner.

The news follows a report that Danish sailors have serious concerns about becoming infected when they visit west-African ports.





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