Councils to fight fitness-related doping abuse among youths

Up to three councils will be chosen as inspiration sources

The government set aside over 6 million kroner in 2013 to help the nation’s local councils tackle fitness-related doping abuse among young people aged 13-25, and from today, the councils can apply for additional funds.

The government will select two or three of the applicants and ask them to detail their experiences. It will then collate and evaluate their experiences in order to inspire other councils looking to introduce preventative measures in regards to doping abuse.

“The anti-doping councils must prevent drug abuse among youths,” Marianne Jelved, the culture minister, said in a press release. “It’s important the youths have a healthy relationship with their bodies and working out.”

“The young need to develop good habits when working out. They need to have a culture where doping is not acceptable.”

READ MORE: Anti-doping authority admits massive blunder

Anti Doping Danmark will assist
The chosen councils will establish local initiatives in co-operation with relevant people from the youth environment such as schools, youth institutions, clubs, sports associations and fitness centres. Additionally, the police and abuse treatment centres should be involved.

The anti-doping authority Anti Doping Danmark, which is experienced in preventing doping, will be connected to the local council project as a sparring partner and will contribute to the development, planning and execution of specific activities and initiatives.

In May this year, parliament agreed to a new sports plan that included further strengthening efforts to curtail doping.





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