Truckers becoming a nasty menace in Danish border town

The Jutlandic town of Padborg on the border with Germany is currently under siege from truckers leaving behind undesirable waste while waiting in the town for their next job.

And it's not just empty coke cans and plastic bags that the truckers leave behind, according to Thim Christensen, a superintendent with the property company HLV Ejendomme.

"We have a problem on the rise here," Christensen said. "There are more and more eastern European truckers coming to the town and it's particularly bad during weekends."

"They leave their excrement all over the place. We've had a number of episodes when we've had to pick up human excrement and we are tired of it."

READ MORE: EU taking on Danish trucking laws

Alcohol a problem too
HLV Ejendomme owns a number of properties in the town's industrial area, where the customs station is located, and renters often complain about the truckers leaving a mess behind. The company is called to clean up after the truckers at least twice a week.

And the truckers are also partial to antisocial driving behaviour as well. BT tabloid reports that so far this year, 13 eastern European truckers have been found to be over the alcohol limit.

Padborg is a well-established transport hub. On any given day, truckers from all over Europe can be found hanging out in the town awaiting their next job.





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