Donald Duck, the Log Lady and the bromance is back

Currently I’m in a state of giddy shock. I recently learned I’m about to be reunited with my first love. 

I remember how it all began back in 1990, sitting in school and eavesdropping on my art tutors’ hushed conversation about this acclaimed American filmmaker and his surrealistic soap opera coming to BBC2. 

I’d never heard of David Lynch before that moment, but shortly afterwards, Twin Peaks was all I could talk about – and think about. Now, with the announcement of nine new episodes coming in 2016, I’m in a similar state of wonder. In the meantime, I’ll try and get my shit together to tell you about the coming week’s cinema.

The half-term holidays have crept up on us, so for those cinephiles with offspring, you could do worse than taking the little demons to see Gremlins on Tuesday (14th) at 16:30 as part of a two-week World’s Best Children’s Film program at Cinemateket. 

Similarly, Huset are screening the strangest Donald Duck shorts on Wednesday from original 16 & 35mm prints. There’s one about Donald having a nightmare about working in a Nazi munitions factory – perfect for the kids. Also at Huset there’s a fascinating evening, Analogic Bodies, exploring the human body, which concludes with Fantastic Voyage (see huset-kbh.dk for details).

MIX continues to dominate Cinemateket with a vast, eclectic program of international shorts, documentaries and features that explore and celebrate sexuality in all its forms (see dfi.dk/Filmhuset for details).

On general release there’s Dracula Untold (see our review), the first offering in the run-up to Halloween, and The Trip To Italy, Michael Winterbottom’s follow-up to his 2010 food-with-funnies bromance The Trip, again starring Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan. There’s also The Invisible Woman, the story of Charles Dickens’ secret lover starring and directed by Ralph Fiennes.

As for myself, I can only focus on one filmmaker for the moment – and instead of the cinema, I’ll visit The Log Lady Café on Studiestræde to celebrate with a damn fine coffee and a slice of cherry pie.





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