DI: Universities need to work better with companies

Better co-operation key to future prosperity, according to the confederation of industry

According to a report released today by the industrial advocates Dansk Industri (DI), Danish universities vary dramatically in their ability to work with industry to develop products and technological solutions.

Charlotte Rønhof of DI explained that the organisation wants there to be more openness in drawing attention to this variation. “Our study shows that some universities do it very well, while others are a long way off from satisfactorily co-operating with companies,” she said in a press release.

“There is a reluctance to discuss how some do it better than others. We want to change that with our study. Some universities can learn a lot from the best,”

DTU top of the class
DI surveyed 400 companies deemed to represent the most research-orientated and innovative in Denmark on how they judged the various institutions. The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) came out best in the comparison, with 70 percent of companies saying that DTU is good or very good. The other institutions trailed behind significantly.

DI also asked the companies surveyed which research areas they would most like to see universities work in. Energy and environmental technology, manufacturing technology and research in materials came out top.

Rønhof cites Denmark’s success with wind turbines, pumps and food production as examples of where close co-operation between the business community and researchers have benefited the country.

“Close co-operation between companies and universities is a prerequisite for developing groundbreaking technologies and unique products that we can export to the whole world,” she said.

“In this way, it’s also a requirement for creating jobs and prosperity in Denmark.”





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