Tax-cheating barbers cutting into legit profits, say hairdressers

A rash of low-priced hair-cutters has the industry calling for tighter controls

Established barbers and hairdressers in the Capital Region are launching a national campaign to clean up their industry. Tax-cheating hair-cutters hurt legitimate businesses, they argue, and they should be closed down.

“Anyone advertising a haircut for 75 kroner is not paying taxes,” industry spokesperson Connie Mikkelsen told Politiken newspaper. “If someone is doing undeclared work, it is unfair to those paying what they should pay.”

Order in the chair
Mikkelsen said that the tax authorities Skat should be investigating the cheating clip joints. “We need order,” she said.

Failure to issue a written receipt after a haircut could be one sign that a barber is working off the books, according to Mikkelsen.





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