Breast-feeding mothers take over Danish railway stations

The protesters want the practice to be considered acceptable in public

While several parts of the country were flooded by heavy rain this morning, railway stations in Copenhagen, Aarhus, Odense, Esbjerg, Fredericia, Herning and Aalborg experienced a flood of breast-feeding women, DR reports.

The lactating women were trying to put across a message that breast-feeding in public should be considered normal.

"I'm here because I think it is important for women to be able to breast-feed in public spaces," Nanna Reffstrup told the broadcaster.

"The current debate is driven by people who don't understand that babies need to eat often. Sometimes their tone is downright nasty," Reffstrup commented.

Making public breast-feeding respectable
Public breast-feeding has previously provoked uproar and caused heated discussions about whether it should be allowed or not.

Kimmie Andersen, who joined the protesters, believes it is important to raise awareness of the issue.

She is tired of listening to people's unpleasant comments whenever she wants to feed her daughter in public spaces.

"I have experienced people giving me strange looks and calling my breast-feeding both creepy and disgusting," Andersen remarked. 

Breaking the taboo
Another breast-feeding protester, Caroline Brask from Skanderborg, told the broadcaster that breast-feeding is considered taboo in Denmark.

"Many people frown upon public breast-feeding and women, therefore, choose to feed their babies from a bottle instead. We want to make breast-feeding in public spaces acceptable," Brask explained.





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