Aid restructured in wake of asylum crisis

A greater portion of Danish aid is going to refugees

With conflicts displacing more than 50 million worldwide, the number of asylum-seekers arriving in Denmark has shot up this year and Danish aid efforts will now be restructured to reflect that development.

For the remainder of this year and next year, a greater portion of Danish development aid will be restructured to help receive refugees arriving in Denmark.

”The world is on fire and more than 50 million people are on the run,” Mogens Jensen, the development minister, said in a press release.

”We are currently in an extraordinary situation with some extraordinarily massive humanitarian needs to assist the refugees abroad and in Denmark, where many seek refuge.”

READ MORE: The largest influx of asylum-seekers in 20 years

Programs postponed and annulled
For the remainder of 2014, an additional 350 million kroner of aid will help fund asylum expenses in Denmark, as will a further 2.5 billion kroner in 2015.

The increased asylum aid will be obtained by postponing certain development programs in Africa and Asia and downgrading aid to a number of nations and organisations. Furthermore, some aid contributions will be completely annulled.

Jensen maintained that the restructuring was temporary and would not influence co-operation agreements that had already been agreed to.





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