Danish art and culture on display in China

The massive culture push will last until July 2015

The culture minister, Marianne Jelved, is currently in China to launch the largest ever display of Danish art and culture in China.

Over the next ten months, Danish and Chinese institutions will co-operate to present an ambitious culture program. Featuring over 60 events, it will include exhibitions, concerts, film festivals, literary events, art and theatre.

“China plays a central role in the government's focus on increased international culture exchange,” Jelved said in a press release.

“The efforts will allow the Danish culture institutions the option to enter interact with the Chinese audience. At the same time, it lends the opportunity to promote Denmark's special competencies and talents within art, music and design.”

READ MORE: Danish-Chinese energy co-operation beginning to pay off

Lots of interest 
There will also be events that focus on architecture and arts and craft, particularly focusing on youngsters.

Among the Danish participants in China are the National Museum of Denmark, the National Gallery of Denmark, the Viking Ship Museum, the Danish Dance Theatre, the Royal Danish Academy of Music and the Royal Ballet School in Holstebro.

As part of her visit, Jelved will also participate in the opening of the Danish Culture Centre in Beijing and attend a seminar about HC Andersen.





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