Final IPCC negotiations get under way in Copenhagen

The final report is scheduled to be released on November 2

Policy-makers and scientists worldwide have descended on the Danish capital from October 27-31 this week to negotiate the terms for the final instalment of the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the global body for assessing the science related to climate change.

The final report, which is scheduled to be published on November 2 in Copenhagen, will be the most significant global overview of climate change in history.

"Let me take the opportunity on behalf of the IPCC to express my deep gratitude to the government of Denmark for hosting this session in this beautiful city,” Rajendra K Pachauri, the chairman of the IPCC, said in his opening statement on Monday.

“Copenhagen has long been known for its enlightened citizens and their deep commitment to efficient energy use and sustainable development. So it is indeed fitting for the IPCC to complete the Synthesis Report of the Fifth Assessment here.”

READ MORE: EU agrees on climate targets

Five years coming
The final element of the AR5 series will be a 'Synthesis Report' that conveys all of the findings from three earlier working groups from this past year into a concise 100-page document that provides policy-makers worldwide with essential information regarding climate change and changes that need to be made.

Working Group 1 covered the physical science of climate change, Working Group 2 covered vulnerability to climate impacts and adaptation, while Working Group 3 involved mitigation strategies to tackle climate change.

The release of the final report on Sunday will bring an end to five years of work by 830 scientists across 85 countries, 1,200 contributors and 3,700 experts drawing on more than 30,000 pieces of research and 143,000 expert comments.





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