High hopes as funds secured for research into medicinal cannabis

Research could pave the way for prescription pot

A political agreement has been reached between all of the political parties in parliament for funding research into the medicinal effects of cannabis, Jyllands-Posten reports.

Agreement was reached yesterday as to how the 857 million kroner research reserve should be spent, and at least 35 million kroner will go towards looking into the role of the drug in bettering the health and life quality of patients – for example by using it for pain relief.

The need for an informed debate
Enhedslisten’s research spokesperson Rosa Lund highlighted that sufferers of multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, arthritis and cancer could potentially benefit. “In some parts of the world medicinal cannabis is already legal, and it helps a lot of people,” she said.

“Therefore we’d also like to see if it’s possible in Denmark. Even if the research comes out against Enhedslisten’s position, there’s the need to do more research so we have an informed basis from which to debate the issue.”

Sophie Carsten Nielsen, the education and research minister, believes that it is also good news for the research community. “It’s a great result that we’ve reached a broad agreement,” she said.

“The agreement will ensure growth in Denmark because research and innovation are crucial for Denmark’s future.”





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