Copenhagen experiences warmest November night for 140 years

And last month was the second-warmest October in history

On Sunday, the IPCC revealed its much-anticipated climate report, and later that night, the weather offered up the warmest temperatures ever measured during a November night in Copenhagen's history.

One of the nation's oldest weather stations near Landbohøjskolen school in Frederiksberg – which has measured temperatures every day since 1874 – showed that temperatures didn't fall below 12.3 degrees Celsius on Sunday night, making it the warmest November night for at least 140 years.

The previous record was recorded on 2 November 1968, when the night temperature didn't fall below 12.0 degrees.

READ MORE: Climate change bringing extreme weather to Danish horizon

Hot October too
According to the national meteorologists DMI, the temperature figures from last night are still being analysed, but the record looks to be legitimate.

DMI also revealed over the weekend that last month was the second-warmest October month since 1874.

The temperature average last month was 12.1 degrees – just 0.1 degree off the 12.2 degree record set in 2006.

According to DMI, night-time temperatures in the capital region are expected to fall steadily towards zero over November. Copenhageners can expect their first frost on the morning of November 18 or 19. 





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