Western suburbs of Copenhagen most violent area in Denmark

Police: Football games partially to blame

Glostrup, Albertslund and Brøndby are the most violent councils in the country, according to new figures from the national statistics keepers Danmarks Statistik, which document the number of registered cases of violence per capita.

All three councils are located in Vestegnen, the western suburbs of the capital region, which showed over four reports of violence for every 1,000 residents over the course of the first three months of 2014. Carsten Jansson, the deputy police inspector with Vestegnen Police, attributed the figures to football games at Brøndby Stadium.

”There is no doubt that the football games have their share of the blame,” Jansson told Metroxpress newspaper.

”We see some considerable episodes of violence from time to time when the fans make their way to and from the stadium. Glostrup Station is a central hub in that connection.”

READ MORE: Copenhagen falling behind – in violence

Esbjerg on better behaviour
Lolland Council finished fourth on the list, while Nyborg Council in Funen completed the top five. Copenhagen, Odense, Guldborgsund, Bornholm and yet another Vestegn council Ishøj rounded up the top ten.

Esbjerg, which has finished top for the past two years, looks to have made progress, as its number of registered cases of violence per 1,000 people fell from 3.6 to 2.9.

The area where one is least likely to encounter a punch on the nose is on Denmark's most eastern island, Christiansø (just east of Bornholm), where not one case of violence has been registered among its 90 inhabitants since 2007. Of course, it would only take one incident to see it hit double figures and sail into first place.





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