Concerns raised about new drug on the rave scene

NBOMe has already killed one man in Denmark

A new and extremely cheap psychedelic drug has hit the Danish rave scene.

The police warn against the dangerous tabs, known as NBOMe, which have already cost a young Danish man's life.

Looks like an acid tab
Similar in appearance to an acid tab or a miniature stamp, the drug is sold as a small, colourful tab that measures 50mm by 50mm. They only cost 20 kroner.

"The drug is very potent. Like LSD, it has a hallucinogenic effect but stronger," Bjarne Christensen, a Copenhagen police commissioner, explained to Metroxpress.

19 deaths in US in 2013
In United States, 19 people died after taking NBOMe last year.

In Denmark, the drug killed a 22-year-old man from Holstebro during the summer.

The drug causes numerous side-effects such as paranoia, seizures, nausea, constriction of blood vessels and involuntary muscle spasms.

A report by the Health Protection Agency reveals that the country's Forensic Institute investigated one serious case of NBOMe in 2012, while in 2013 it handled 20.

Illegal in Denmark since 2012
NBOMe is a common name for a number of substances that can cause severe hallucinations similar to LSD. 

25I-NBOMe was first manufactured by a chemist in Berlin in 2003, but it was not until 2010 when people started to use it as an intoxicant. 

The substance became illegal in Denmark in November 2012.





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