Regardless of their standing, IKEA employees to share generous Christmas bonus

19,000 kroner to be paid out to those who have worked for five years or more

Regardless of whether they are top management or shop floor staff, IKEA's employees are sharing a healthy Christmas loyalty bonus this year – providing they've been with the company at least five years. 

As a thank you gift for good and loyal service, the company is rewarding those who qualify with a 19,000 kroner retirement bonus as part of its the 'Tack' (thank you) program. 

READ MORE: IKEA Denmark earns over 160 million kroner

Generous bonus for retirement
"It is with great pleasure that I can announce that every full-time employee in Denmark with five years of service or more, will get 18,936 kroner added to their retirement savings this year," Dennis Balslev, the CEO of IKEA Denmark, said in a statement.

Regardless of whether they work in sales or management or serve hotdogs, full-time employees who fulfill the criteria will get the same amount.

Part-time employees, however, will get a lower amount measured according to their working hours.

Celebrating the company's success
The initiative will see the group pay out 200 million euros to the chain's employees worldwide.

The loyalty program, which was first launched in 2013, was instigated by 88-year-old Swedish founder Ingvar Kamprad, who believes the company should share its success with all of its employees.





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