Danish soldiers begin training Kurdish troops

Training team further extends Denmark’s contribution to the fight against IS

Thirty Danish soldiers have begun training Kurdish soldiers and Iraqi security forces in Iraq, the Ministry of Defence said in a press release.

The Danish soldiers are working alongside British troops teaching Kurdish Peshmerga soldiers in medical first aid, shooting and mine exercises.

“We have some very talented soldiers who have extensive experience in training tasks,” Nicolai Wammen, the defence minister, said.  “I’m sure that the training will be valuable in the fight against ISIL.”

The Danish training team first travelled to Cyprus to finalize preparations with the British on November 22 before heading to Iraq. The team is expected to complete its exercises by February 2015.

READ MORE: Danish F-16s enter the fight against IS

By land and sky
The training team is just one of Denmark’s contributions to the fight against IS. In September the government announced it would deploy seven F-16 fighter planes to Iraq.

As opposed to the jets and their pilots who are engaged in combat, the training team will not engage in fighting, but are integral to the success of the fight on the ground.

“The fight against ISIL cannot be won from the air alone,” Wammen said. “It is important in the training of local forces so that the struggle against the vile terrorist organization is also fought on the ground."

Last week, Wammen and Peter Bartram, defence chief, revealed that the Danish F-16s had flown 74 missions and dropped 60 bombs on important IS fighters, buildings, vehicles and hostile forces.





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