Danish firms capitalising on African building boom

Specialists in the construction industry can secure higher fees than in Europe

Africa is fast becoming a key market for Danish companies in the construction industry. A boom in private investment has resulted in fees on the continent being up to 30 percent higher than in Europe, Børsen reports.

Of the ten fastest-growing economies in the world, six are in Africa, which is creating opportunities for contractors, architects and consulting engineers.

New wave
African business now accounts for 25 percent of turnover for the Danish multidisciplinary consultancy Niras, and Carsten Toft Boesen, the head of the company, explained why.

“There’s a new wave,” he said. “Development in Africa has moved in three phases: from pure grants, over to lending aid, and then today, where in some countries there are purely commercial projects that drive a growing demand in Africa.”

Mikael Krøll, the head of the architectural firm Mikael Krøll Arkitekter, told the newspaper that, for his company, co-operating with foreign investors was key to getting a solid position in Sierra Leone and Ghana.

“Building projects in these countries are typically run by foreign developers that need specialists who have both local knowledge and international skills,” he said.

“If you can show your ability to work with the local authorities, you can be a valuable business partner for investors.”





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