Parliament looking into closing controversial mosque

All parties except Enhedslisten on board

The controversial mosque in Grimhøj in Aarhus is a step closer to being shut down in the wake of a DR1 documentary aired this week showing the mosque's members cheering on Islamic State (IS) and criticising democracy.

Danske Folkeparti has called for a debate next week concerning the issue, and every party bar Enhedslisten has called on the justice minister, Mette Frederiksen, to look into the possibility of closing down the mosque.

”The Grimhøj mosque has helped spawn terrorists and we need to stop that,” Martin Henriksen, the DF spokesperson for immigration issues, told DR Nyheder.

”The Grimhøj mosque's imams have several times encouraged violence against Jews, and I really hope this will be enough to declare the mosque illegal.”

The police estimate a large portion of the Danish citizens travelling to fight on behalf of IS in Syria have come from the Grimhøj mosque.

READ MORE: Mosque in Jutland expresses support for IS

Supporting sharia
Following the beheading of two US journalists by IS in August last year, the mosque expressed its support of the aims – if not the tactics – of the jihadist group.

“An Islamic state will always be what we Muslims yearn for, and therefore we cannot help but support IS,” Fadi Abdallah told Den Korte Avis. “Even if they have made mistakes, we must wait and see.”

And in July, the Danish imam Abu Bilal Ismail, a regular speaker at Grimhøj, urged listeners at the Al Nusra mosque in Berlin to kill Zionist Jews.





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