63-year-old man found dead in Esbjerg – son charged with his murder

Father may have been dead a long time before his body was discovered

A 63-year-old man was found dead on Sunday at his home in the north of Esbjerg and his son has been arrested and charged with murder, according to a statement issued by South Jutland Police.

Police were approached by a citizen who told them he were having trouble getting in touch with the victim.

Police went to the man's residence and found a corpse that they suspected was the 63-year-old owner of the house.

Could have been dead for a while
Police then arrested the man's 21-year-old son and charged him with murder.

“The son was in the house when we arrived,” Bent Thuesen from the South Jutland Police told TV2 News.

“The circumstances are not completely clear, but we have charged him based on the conditions in which we found the body.”

READ MORE: Apartment explosion was apparent murder-suicide

In a macabre twist to the case, police said the man may have been dead for several days – or perhaps longer – before his body was discovered.

“I can confirm that [the death] did not happen over the past few days,” said Thuesen.

Thuesen said there are “many unresolved circumstances” in the case. The prosecution has requested that the preliminary hearing be held behind closed doors.





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