Over half of municipalities saw increased housing prices in 2014

Rises were recorded in 54 out of the 98 municipal areas

Housing prices in 54 out of the nation's 98 municipalities were higher in December 2014 than they a year earlier, according to new figures from the real estate portal Boligsiden.dk.

The figures showed that the prices were on average 2.8 percent higher nationally than the previous year. The housing market performed particularly well in Zealand, but it struggled in mid-Jutland.

”The housing prices have on average increased nicely in 2014 nationally,” Birgit Daetz, the head of communication at Boligsiden.dk, said in a press release.

”But there is still a polarisation of the housing market, and not all areas in Denmark have the same amount of wind in their sails in terms of housing sales.”

READ MORE: Up in 2015: Exports, consumption, employment and house prices

Morsø leap
Only a few municipalities in Zealand saw drops in housing prices, while municipalities in Funen, Jutland and the islands saw more sporadic price increases compared to the previous year.

"It looks like the housing prices have spread from the capital, but we don't see the same tendencies around Aarhus. It is worth noting that the prices fell in municipalities such as Silkeborg, Skanderborg and Favrskov, which are in the Aarhus area,” Daetz said.

The prices increased the most in Morsø ( by 61.7 percent), followed by Rebild (21 percent) and Lejre (19.4 percent). At the other end of the spectrum, Jammerbugt fell the most (-13.4 percent), followed by Halsnæs (-12.3 percent) and Middlefart (-10.7 percent).


Fact Box

Top 10:

1. Morsø (61.7 percent)

2. Rebild (21.0 percent)

3. Lejre (19.4 percent)

4. Brøndby (18.6 percent)

5. Rødovre (16.0 percent)

6. Hvidovre (14.3 percent)

7. Sønderborg (13.6 percent)

8. Thisted (13.3 percent)

9. Billund (13.2 percent)

10. Herlev (13.1 percent)

Bottom 10:

Jammerbugt (-13.4 percent)

Halsnæs (-12.3 percent)

Middelfart (-10.7 percent)

Lolland (-10.6 percent)

Skive (-10.2 percent)

Odder (-10.0 percent)

Tønder (-9.7 percent)

Guldborgsund (-9.6 percent)

Ikast-Brande (-9.2 percent)

Randers (-8.8 percent)





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.